Low-cost Medications Are a Bonus for Caregivers in Peru

A customer buys medications in Nortfarma, a Peruvian pharmacy; prices are fixed by a national ministry, and stores that overcharge are fined. (photo: Andina)

In other posts, I’ve written about how affordable home-health aides are in Lima, a benefit that greatly helped our family when caring for my American father in Peru.

Today I want to share another bonus of caregiving in Lima: how medications are sold and dispensed. The Latin American system is so different than the for-profit model used in the United States, it’s shocking–and I mean that in a good way.

Basically, consumers at a Peruvian pharmacy can get almost any medication they want for about 70% less than what it would cost in the United States–without a doctor’s prescription. This savings applies only drugs that are no longer under patent and which are currently manufactured by several companies or as generics. New medications under patent are still full price.

For instance, the memory drug Excelon was still under patent when my father was taking it in 2011, so we had to pay full price (more than US$100 a month) for it in Lima. However, the eight other medications he took daily (Omeprazol, Sertraline, etc.) were available in generic form, and we ended up spending about US$80 a month for all of them together.

The savings were considerable, so we didn’t need his US insurance to cover drug costs. (His prescription plan  didn’t work down in Peru anyway).

I know that some readers are still stuck on that phrase in the third paragraph–“without a doctor’s prescription.”

Yes, that’s right. With the exception of certain drugs (see below), medications are freely dispensed in pharmacies sin receta (without a prescription), and overall, this works to the consumer’s favor in Peru, apart from the hazards of self-medicating. People do go to doctors and get prescriptions, but they aren’t necessary for initial purchase. And this system makes it much easier when you are a caregiver to an elderly person and you have to keep up with lots of refills.

Here is how the ordering process works:

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Eldercare Is Easier in a Nonlitigious Society

This quote, by 17th-century French satirist Jean de la Bruyere, might be said to sum up the attitude of many Peruvians toward civil lawsuits.

I knew when we brought my father to Lima in 2011 that it would be cheaper to give him personalized care there. What I didn’t anticipate is how much easier it would be work with doctors, nurses, health aides and hospitals—in contrast with the bureaucracy and complications of the U.S.

After thinking it over, I’ve come to realize what, exactly, made these interactions easier: Peruvian culture is not very litigious. Unlike in the United States, people don’t generally sue others and institutions over civil matters. And when it comes to medical issues, people rarely take doctors or hospitals to court, even when things go very wrong. For instance, the whole seven years I lived in Lima, Continue Reading

Alzheimer’s Costs Will Bankrupt American Safety Net, Says Association

So today the Alzheimer’s Association released its 2016 report on the disease, and the news doesn’t look good. As reported by CNN and Forbes, we can expect that by 2015, the number of Americans 65 and up with Alzheimer’s will reach 7.1 million; that is an increase of nearly 40 percent from 5.2 million who had it in 2016. Jump forward to 2050, and the view is even bleaker: Probably 13.8 million Americans will have Alzheimer’s, nearly triple the rate of today.

Why the soaring rise? Americans are living into their 80s and beyond, and the older you get, the greater your risk of contracting Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

There is no cure for the disease. No treatment. No early intervention. Gulp.

What we have on our hands is a crisis, Continue Reading

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